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  • Sonic Relief

The Cost of Pain

Updated: Sep 21, 2023



On the surface, “living with pain” may seem like a small thing. Everybody has experienced some level of pain: a sore neck from sleeping wrong or sore muscles after the gym. However, for those who suffer with chronic pain conditions, pain doesn't just stop at the physical ailment. Living with pain can affect every aspect of your life. Not only does it affect your physical health, chronic pain can cause your mental health, sleep, relationships, career, and hobbies to suffer too.


But, one of the most impactful aspects of living with chronic pain is the financial burden of being in pain.


The financial burden comes in many ways. Outgoing costs in the form of a long list of medical expenses, as well as loss of productivity and income due to lost time at work or attention to your business can cause real distress and even hardship.


Medical Expenses


A study by the US Institute of Medicine in 2010 found that chronic pain cost more than $635 Billion each year and it's easy to see why. Even for those who have access to health care coverage and insurance, many of the necessary treatment methods like medications or even physical therapies often aren't covered.


On average, one physical therapy appointment can cost $150. When that price is multiplied by 2 sessions per week over the course of 8 weeks (a schedule that can vary depending on the severity and type of injury or pain condition), that's a total cost of $2,400 for physical therapy alone!


Many who suffer from pain will also have to pay for expensive surgeries, OTC or prescription medications, mobility devices, home therapy devices, and even things like special mattresses to help manage pain and maintain independence.


The cost of pain treatment and management can quickly add up and become an overwhelming source of distress for those who suffer from pain. Many Sonic Relief users say that this is one of their main reasons for using their home ultrasound unit - for only $179 USD they can do the same ultrasound treatments as they get at their physical therapy appointment any time they’d like from the comfort of their own home.



Effects on Career


Living with pain doesn't only put a strain on the money leaving your bank account, it can impact the money entering your accounts as well.


40% of American workers experience chronic pain causing increased absences (often costing PTO or sick days), physical limitations, or reduced job performance. These results can also lead to discrimination or a feeling of ostracisation in the workplace. An aging workforce, extended work hours, and demanding jobs all suggest that chronic pain in the workforce will become even more common in the future.


Ultimately, for many who suffer from pain, the workforce is no longer an option, when the pain becomes too extreme or it keeps you from completing tasks many have to choose to exit the workforce completely or find a new career.


Sonic Relief user Steve G tells us

“Living with it [pain] feels like such a vicious cycle, working in construction I regularly make my pain worse, but I cant afford to take time off for surgery and the recovery time from surgery, especially in my feild I can’t take pain killers because I wont be able to opperate the heavy machinery I need to do my job, so at the end of the day I just end up living with the pain! Thats why I like using my Sonic Relief, its a drug free option that provides relief and lets me do my job until I can take enough time off to get surgery.”

And it's not just people with physical jobs. Keyboard-centric jobs take a real toll on hands, arms, and shoulders, the stress of your pain may make it hard to concentrate or even make it to the office.


Overall, the costs associated with chronic pain can be significant and may include both financial and non-financial costs. It is important for individuals with chronic pain to work closely with their healthcare team to develop a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses their physical, emotional, as well as their financial needs.




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